More Books:

Thus Spoke Zarathustra
Language: en
Pages: 384
Authors: Friedrich Nietzsche
Categories: Literary Collections
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008-08-14 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

Presents the author's ideas about the problem of living a fulfilling life in a meaningless world.
Thus Spake Zarathustra
Language: en
Pages: 270
Authors: Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche
Categories: Literary Collections
Type: BOOK - Published: 1999-01-05 - Publisher: Courier Corporation

The author uses the ancient Persian religious leader, Zarathustra (or Zoroaster) to voice his own views, including the introduction of the controversial doctrine of the "Übermensch" or "superman."
Thus Spoke Zarathustra
Language: en
Pages: 315
Authors: Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche, Clancy Martin, Kathleen M. Higgings, Robert C. Solomon
Categories: Fiction
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007 - Publisher: Fine Communications

The influential German philosopher employs a parodistic Biblical style to convey his philosophy of the future, in which man will have broken with the Christian doctrines of submission and denial of nature to a new way of life based on the affirmation of human life and will.
Nietzsche: Thus Spoke Zarathustra
Language: en
Pages: 316
Authors: Robert Pippin
Categories: Philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 2006-06-15 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Nietzsche regarded 'Thus Spoke Zarathustra' as his most important work, and his story of the wandering Zarathustra has had enormous influence on subsequent culture. Nietzsche uses a mixture of homilies, parables, epigrams and dreams to introduce some of his most striking doctrines, including the Overman, nihilism, and the eternal return
Nietzsche's Teaching
Language: en
Pages: 378
Authors: Laurence Lampert
Categories: Philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 1986-01-01 - Publisher: Yale University Press

The first comprehensive interpretation of Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra--an important and difficult text and the only book Nietzsche ever wrote with characters, events, setting, and a plot. Laurence Lampert's chapter-by-chapter commentary on Nietzsche's magnum opus clarifies not only Zarathustra's narrative structure but also the development of Nietzsche's thinking as a