More Books:

The Pleasures of Computer Gaming
Language: un
Pages: 203
Authors: Melanie Swalwell, Jason Wilson
Categories: Games & Activities
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-05-12 - Publisher: McFarland

This collection of essays situates the digital gaming phenomenon alongside broader debates in cultural and media studies. Contributors to this volume maintain that computer games are not simply toys, but rather circulate as commodities, new media technologies, and items of visual culture that are embedded in complex social practices. Apart
Game History and the Local
Language: un
Pages: 240
Authors: Melanie Swalwell
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-06-11 - Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

This book brings together essays on game history and historiography that reflect on the significance of locality. Game history did not unfold uniformly and the particularities of space and place matter, yet most digital game and software histories are silent with respect to geography. Topics covered include: hyper-local games; temporal
HCI in Games
Language: en
Pages: 534
Authors: Xiaowen Fang
Categories: Computers
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-07-10 - Publisher: Springer Nature

This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the Second International Conference on HCI in Games, HCI-Games 2020, held in July 2020 as part of HCI International 2020 in Copenhagen, Denmark.* HCII 2020 received a total of 6326 submissions, of which 1439 papers and 238 posters were accepted for publication after
Media International Australia
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Xiaowen Fang
Categories: Australia
Type: BOOK - Published: 2004 - Publisher:

Books about Media International Australia
Homebrew Gaming and the Beginnings of Vernacular Digitality
Language: un
Pages: 248
Authors: Melanie Swalwell
Categories: Games & Activities
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-08-17 - Publisher: MIT Press

The overlooked history of an early appropriation of digital technology: the creation of games though coding and hardware hacking by microcomputer users. From the late 1970s through the mid-1980s, low-end microcomputers offered many users their first taste of computing. A major use of these inexpensive 8-bit machines--including the TRS System