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The Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Rome
Language: en
Pages: 144
Authors: Chris Scarre
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1995-09-01 - Publisher: Penguin Books

More than fifteen centuries after its fall, the Roman Empire remains one of the most formative influences on the history of Europe. Its physical remains dot the landscape from Scotland to Syria. Its cities are still the great metropolises of the continent. Its law and institutions have shaped modern practice,
The Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Rome
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Christopher Scarre
Categories: Classical geography
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007 - Publisher:

Books about The Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Rome
The Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Civilizations
Language: en
Pages: 144
Authors: John Haywood
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2005-10-25 - Publisher: Penguin Books

An broad-based survey of the world's earliest human cultures ranges from the ancient farming settlements of Mesopotamia to the founding of Rome, utilizing photographs, artwork, reproductions, and full-color maps to highlight a look at such topics as the origins of the Egyptian pharaohs, China's dynasties, and the great cities of
The Penguin Historical Atlas of the Medieval World
Language: en
Pages: 144
Authors: Andrew Jotischky, Caroline Hull
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2005-10-25 - Publisher: Penguin

The Penguin Historical Atlas of the Medieval World traces the development of peoples, cultures, and faiths between the coming of the barbarian invasions in the fourth century and the first voyages to the New World in the sixteenth. This colorful atlas illustrates the sweeping changes from the fall of the
The Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Greece
Language: en
Pages: 144
Authors: Robert Morkot
Categories: Reference
Type: BOOK - Published: 1997-01-01 - Publisher: Penguin Books

The cradle of Western civilisation, Ancient Greece was a land of contradictions and conflict. Intensely quarrelsome and competitive, the Greek city-states consistently proved unwilling and unable to unite. Yet, in spite of or even because of this internal discord, no ancient civilization proved so dynamic or productive. The Greeks not