More Books:

The Importance of Being Earnest and Other Plays
Language: un
Pages: 464
Authors: Oscar Wilde
Categories: Drama
Type: BOOK - Published: 2000-05-25 - Publisher: Penguin UK

Lady Windermere's Fan/Salomé/A Woman of No Importance/An Ideal Husband/A Florentine Tragedy/The Importance of Being Earnest 'To lose one parent may be regarded as a misfortune; to lose both looks like carelessness' The Importance of Being Earnest is a glorious comedy of mistaken identity, which ridicules codes of propriety and etiquette.
The Importance of Being Earnest
Language: un
Pages: 160
Authors: Oscar Wilde
Categories: Drama
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-01-22 - Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

The Importance of Being Earnest is one of the most enduringly popular of British comic dramas, and a mainstay of English literature and drama courses at college and university level. This is an ideal edition for students with on-page notes to help clarify meaning, and a completely new introduction. In
The Importance of Being Earnest
Language: un
Pages: 54
Authors: Oscar Wilde
Categories: Drama
Type: BOOK - Published: 1990-01-01 - Publisher: Courier Corporation

Witty and buoyant comedy of manners is brilliantly plotted from its effervescent first act to its hilarious denouement, and filled with some of literature's most famous epigrams. Widely considered Wilde's most perfect work, the play is reprinted here from an authoritative early British edition. Note to the Dover Edition.
The Importance of Being Earnest and Other Plays
Language: un
Pages: 368
Authors: Oscar Wilde
Categories: Drama
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008-04-17 - Publisher: Oxford Paperbacks

Offers newly edited texts of five of the British playwright's works, including the great farcial comedy "The Importance of Being Earnest."
The Importance of Being Earnest
Language: un
Pages: 151
Authors: Oscar Wilde
Categories: England
Type: BOOK - Published: 1899 - Publisher:

Subtitled “A Trivial Comedy for Serious People,” Wilde’s play is a brilliantly satirical comedy of manners, sending up the absurdity of Victorian social mores and cleverly critiquing the conventions of love and marriage. The tale of two gentlemen who adopt fictitious identities in order to woo the objects of their