More Books:

The Etruscan World
Language: en
Pages: 1216
Authors: Jean MacIntosh Turfa
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-11-13 - Publisher: Routledge

The Etruscans can be shown to have made significant, and in some cases perhaps the first, technical advances in the central and northern Mediterranean. To the Etruscan people we can attribute such developments as the tie-beam truss in large wooden structures, surveying and engineering drainage and water tunnels, the development
The Etruscan World
Language: en
Pages: 1167
Authors: Jean MacIntosh Turfa
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-07-28 - Publisher:

The Etruscans can be shown to have made significant, and in some cases perhaps the first, technical advances in the central and northern Mediterranean. To the Etruscan people we can attribute such developments as the tie-beam truss in large wooden structures, surveying and engineering drainage and water tunnels, the development
Divining the Etruscan World
Language: en
Pages: 408
Authors: Jean MacIntosh Turfa
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-07-16 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

The first complete English translation of the Brontoscopic Calendar, providing an understanding of Etruscan Iron Age society as revealed through the ancient text.
The Etruscan World
Language: en
Pages: 1216
Authors: Jean Turfa
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014 - Publisher:

The Etruscans can be shown to have made significant, and in some cases perhaps the first, technical advances in the central and northern Mediterranean. To the Etruscan people we can attribute such developments as the tie-beam truss in large wooden structures, surveying and engineering drainage and water tunnels, the development
The Etruscans
Language: en
Pages: 208
Authors: Lucy Shipley
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-10-15 - Publisher: Reaktion Books

The Etruscans were a powerful people, marked by an influential civilization in ancient Italy. But despite their prominence, the Etruscans are often portrayed as mysterious—a strange and unknowable people whose language and culture have largely vanished. Lucy Shipley’s The Etruscans presents a different picture. Shipley writes of a people who