More Books:

Economics of Judicial Behaviour
Language: en
Pages:
Authors:
Categories:
Type: BOOK - Published: - Publisher:

Books about Economics of Judicial Behaviour
The Economics of Judicial Behaviour
Language: en
Pages: 916
Authors: Lee Epstein
Categories: Law
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013 - Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing

This excellent two-volume collection contains the very best studies that take an economic approach to the study of judicial behaviour. the authors hail from the disciplines of business, economics, history, law, and political science, and the topics they cover are equally varied. Subjects include the judges' motivations, judicial independence, precedent,
The Strategic Analysis of Judicial Behavior
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Lee Epstein, Keren Weinshall
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-06-30 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

The past decade has witnessed a worldwide explosion of work aimed at illuminating judicial-behavior: the choices judges make and the consequences of their choices. We focus on strategic accounts of judicial-behavior. As in other approaches to judging, preferences and institutions play a central role but strategic accounts are unique in
Essays on the Economics of Judicial Independence and the Effectiveness of Criminal Defense
Language: en
Pages: 88
Authors: Hossein Alikamar Abbasi
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009 - Publisher:

In this study I provide an empirical analysis of the judicial system. The main emphasis of this study is on the causes and consequences of judicial independence. In the first chapter, I analyze the determinants of judicial independence in a cross-country setting. I investigate the empirical evidence for two hypotheses
The Economics of Courts and Litigation
Language: en
Pages: 288
Authors: Francisco Cabrillo, Sean Fitzpatrick
Categories: Law
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008-01-01 - Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing

Dissatisfaction with the working of courts is ubiquitous. Legal inertia and maladministration are the norm in many countries and have significant social and economic repercussions. No longer a theme relegated to the peripheries of economic analysis, the administration of justice is now recognised by most economists as being of fundamental