More Books:

Starting with Hume
Language: en
Pages: 200
Authors: Charlotte Randall Brown, William Edward Morris
Categories: Philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-05-24 - Publisher: A&C Black

David Hume is widely regarded as the greatest English thinker in the history of philosophy. His contributions to a huge range of philosophical debates are as important and influential now as they were in the eighteenth century. This book provides an introduction to the ideas of this hugely significant thinker.
Starting with Hume
Language: en
Pages: 200
Authors: Charlotte Randall Brown, William Edward Morris
Categories: Philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-05-24 - Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

This book presents a new introduction to Hume, guiding the student through the key concepts of Hume's work by examining the overall development of his ideas. David Hume is widely regarded as the greatest English thinker in the history of philosophy. His contributions to a huge range of philosophical debates
Starting with Kant
Language: en
Pages: 192
Authors: Andrew Ward
Categories: Philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-07-05 - Publisher: A&C Black

A new introduction to Kant, guiding the student through the key concepts of his work by examining the overall development of his ideas.
Hume and the Politics of Enlightenment
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Thomas W. Merrill
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-07-23 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

'Methinks I am like a man, who having narrowly escap'd shipwreck', David Hume writes in A Treatise of Human Nature, 'has yet the temerity to put out to sea in the same leaky weather-beaten vessel, and even carries his ambition so far as to think of compassing the globe'. With
The Achilles of Rationalist Psychology
Language: en
Pages: 290
Authors: Thomas M. Lennon, Robert J. Stainton
Categories: Philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008-01-22 - Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

In his Second Paralogism of the Critique of Pure Reason, Kant described what he called the "Achilles of all dialectical inferences in the pure doctrine of the soul". This argument, which he took to be powerful yet fatally flawed, purports to establish the simplicity of the human mind, or soul,