More Books:

Soviet Animation and the Thaw of the 1960s
Language: en
Pages: 248
Authors: Laura Pontieri
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012 - Publisher: John Libbey & Company Limited

Soviet Animation and the Thaw of the 1960s examines the remarkable animation that emerged during the post-Stalin period of liberalization in the Soviet Union as an avenue of expression for a new spirit of aesthetic freedom. Drawing on extensive archival research, Laura Pontieri reconstructs the dynamics inside Soviet animation studios
Russian Animation of the 1960s and the Khrushchev Thaw
Language: en
Pages: 644
Authors: Laura Pontieri
Categories: Animated films
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007 - Publisher:

Books about Russian Animation of the 1960s and the Khrushchev Thaw
Drawing the Iron Curtain
Language: en
Pages: 304
Authors: Maya Balakirsky Katz
Categories: Art
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-07-15 - Publisher: Rutgers University Press

In the American imagination, the Soviet Union was a drab cultural wasteland, a place where playful creative work and individualism was heavily regulated and censored. Yet despite state control, some cultural industries flourished in the Soviet era, including animation. Drawing the Iron Curtain tells the story of the golden age
Graphic Satire in the Soviet Union
Language: en
Pages: 240
Authors: John Etty
Categories: Art
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-01-15 - Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

After the death of Joseph Stalin, Soviet-era Russia experienced a flourishing artistic movement due to relaxed censorship and new economic growth. In this new atmosphere of freedom, Russia's satirical magazine Krokodil (The Crocodile) became rejuvenated. John Etty explores Soviet graphic satire through Krokodil and its political cartoons. He investigates the
She Animates
Language: en
Pages: 230
Authors: Lora Mjolsness, Michele Leigh
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-02-02 - Publisher: Academic Studies PRess

She Animates examines the work of twelve female animation directors in the Soviet Union and Russia, who have long been overlooked by film scholars and historians. Our approach examines these directors within history, culture, and industrial practice in animation. In addition to making a case for including these women and