More Books:

Reading Raymond Carver
Language: en
Pages: 248
Authors: Randolph Paul Runyon
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 1993-09-01 - Publisher: Syracuse University Press

In this study of the late, lamented writer (d. 1988), Runyon reveals an ambitious metafiction beneath the terse style of Carver's works and places Carver squarely in the context of the minimalist debate. Foreword by Stephen Dobyns. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR
Conversations with Raymond Carver
Language: en
Pages: 259
Authors: Raymond Carver
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 1990 - Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

This collection of Raymond Carver's interviews reveals him to have been perhaps the premier short-story writer of his generation, a lyric-narrative poet of singular resonance, and a staunch proponent of realistic fiction in the wake of postmodern formalism. The twenty-five conversations gathered here, several available in English for the first
Raymond Carver's Short Fiction in the History of Black Humor
Language: en
Pages: 142
Authors: Jingqiong Zhou
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2006 - Publisher: Peter Lang

This first book-length study on the black humor in Raymond Carver's work includes valuable interpretations of Carver's aesthetics as well as the psycho-social implications of his short fiction. The presence of an indeterminate «menace» in the oppressive situations of black humor in Carver - as compared to a European tradition
Technique and Sensibility in the Fiction and Poetry of Raymond Carver
Language: en
Pages: 340
Authors: Arthur F. Bethea
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-04-03 - Publisher: Routledge

A comprehensive examination of the fiction and poetry of Raymond Carver.
Raymond Carver
Language: en
Pages: 592
Authors: Carol Sklenicka
Categories: Biography & Autobiography
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009-11-24 - Publisher: Simon and Schuster

The first biography of america’s best-known short story writer of the late twentieth century. The London Times called Raymond Carver "the American Chekhov." The beloved, mischievous, but more modest short-story writer and poet thought of himself as "a lucky man" whose renunciation of alcohol allowed him to live "ten years