More Books:

Peace Without Consensus
Language: en
Pages: 232
Authors: Mary-Alice C. Clancy
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-05-13 - Publisher: Routledge

'Peace Without Consensus' demonstrates that the rise of Sinn Féin and the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) was not 'inevitable'. Rather, it argues that critics who blame Northern Ireland's power-sharing institutions for the electoral triumph of the political 'extremes' in 2003 have not fully considered how the US, British and Irish
Peace Without Consensus
Language: en
Pages: 232
Authors: Mary-Alice C. Clancy
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-05-13 - Publisher: Routledge

'Peace Without Consensus' demonstrates that the rise of Sinn Féin and the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) was not 'inevitable'. Rather, it argues that critics who blame Northern Ireland's power-sharing institutions for the electoral triumph of the political 'extremes' in 2003 have not fully considered how the US, British and Irish
Peace Without Consensus
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: M. A. C. Clancy
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008 - Publisher:

Books about Peace Without Consensus
Lessons from the Northern Ireland Peace Process
Language: en
Pages: 309
Authors: Timothy J. White
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013 - Publisher: University of Wisconsin Pres

From the early 1970s through the mid-1990s, Northern Ireland was the site of bitter conflict between those struggling for reunification with the rest of Ireland and those wanting the region to remain a part of the United Kingdom. After years of strenuous negotiations, nationalists and unionists came together in 1998
Compromising on Justice
Language: en
Pages: 132
Authors: Fabian Wendt
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-06-30 - Publisher: Routledge

When we compromise on justice, we accept or acquiesce to an arrangement that we judge to be unjust, or at least not fully just. Such arrangements are often described as constituting a ‘modus vivendi’. What reasons could we have to accept a modus vivendi, thereby compromising on justice? Given the