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Virginia Woolf
Language: en
Pages: 230
Authors: Lorraine Sim
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-02-11 - Publisher: Routledge

In her timely contribution to revisionist approaches in modernist studies, Lorraine Sim offers a reading of Virginia Woolf's conception of ordinary experience as revealed in her fiction and nonfiction. Contending that Woolf's representations of everyday life both acknowledge and provide a challenge to characterizations of daily life as mundane, Sim
New Hebron
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Lorraine Sim
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: - Publisher: Bill Scott

Books about New Hebron
Virginia Woolf and the Materiality of Theory
Language: en
Pages: 232
Authors: Derek Ryan
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-09-01 - Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

Derek Ryan demonstrates how materiality is theorised in Woolf's writings by focusing on the connections she makes between culture and nature, embodiment and environment, human and nonhuman, life and matter.
Virginia Woolf and Heritage
Language: en
Pages: 285
Authors: Jane deGay, Tom Breckin, Anne Reus
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-01-01 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

This volume aims to situate Virginia Woolf as a writer who, despite her fame as a leading modernist, also drew on a rich literary and cultural heritage. The chapters in this volume explore the role her family heritage, literary tradition and heritage locations play in Woolf' s works, uncovering the
Hellenism and Loss in the Work of Virginia Woolf
Language: en
Pages: 252
Authors: Theodore Koulouris
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-04-22 - Publisher: Routledge

Taking up Virginia Woolf's fascination with Greek literature and culture, this book explores her engagement with the nineteenth-century phenomenon of British Hellenism and her transformation of that multifaceted socio-cultural and political reality into a particular textual aesthetic, which Theodore Koulouris defines as 'Greekness.' Woolf was a lifelong student of Greek,