More Books:

Freud and Beyond
Language: en
Pages: 336
Authors: Stephen A. Mitchell, Margaret J. Black
Categories: Psychology
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-05-10 - Publisher: Basic Books

Freud's concepts have become a part of our psychological vocabulary: unconscious thoughts and feelings, conflict, the meaning of dreams, the sensuality of childhood. But psychoanalytic thinking has undergone an enormous expansion and transformation over the past fifty years. With Freud and Beyond, Stephen A. Mitchell and Margaret J. Black make
Beyond the Pleasure Principle
Language: en
Pages: 64
Authors: Sigmund Freud
Categories: Psychology
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-02-18 - Publisher: Courier Corporation

Controversial 1920 publication expands Freud's theoretical approach to include the death drive. The philosopher's concept of the ongoing struggle between harmony (Eros) and destruction (Thanatos) influenced his subsequent work.
Beyond Freud
Language: en
Pages: 418
Authors: Sigmund Freud
Categories: Psychology
Type: BOOK - Published: 1985 - Publisher: Lawrence Erlbaum Assoc Incorporated

Books about Beyond Freud
Beyond the Pleasure Principle
Language: en
Pages: 400
Authors: Sigmund Freud
Categories: Psychology
Type: BOOK - Published: 2011-03-02 - Publisher: Broadview Press

Beyond the Pleasure Principle is Freud’s most philosophical and speculative work, exploring profound questions of life and death, pleasure and pain. In it Freud introduces the fundamental concepts of the “repetition compulsion” and the “death drive,” according to which a perverse, repetitive, self-destructive impulse opposes and even trumps the creative
Queer Beauty
Language: en
Pages: 416
Authors: Whitney Davis
Categories: Philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010-09-22 - Publisher: Columbia University Press

The pioneering work of Johann Winckelmann (1717-1768) identified a homoerotic appreciation of male beauty in classical Greek sculpture, a fascination that had endured in Western art since the Greeks. After Winckelmann, however, sometimes the value (even the possibility) of queer beauty in art was denied. Several theorists after Winckelmann, notably